B A B E S C H Annual Papers on Mediterranean Archaeology
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The Board of the BABESCH Foundation presents

The TEnth Annual Byvanck Lecture

held on Tuesday 29 NOVember 2016
at the National Museum of Antiquities in Leiden, The Netherlands

Dr. Guy Sanders
'Recent Finds from Ancient Corinth:
How Little Things Make Big Differences'

The location of Corinth at the Isthmus has ensured that from the Neolithic to the beginnings of the Modern Greek State, the city has had a central role in the commerce of the Eastern Mediterranean. Its location is also responsible for the poverty, in the archaeological record, of the famous wealth of the city with the result that researchers have been forced to concentrate on the mundane.

Over the past 20 years we have adopted Northern European methodologies replacing those traditionally used by Classical archaeologists and, as a result, the little things we find have made big differences to the way we think about chronology, material culture and the place of Corinth in the past. Corinth’s cultural “reach”, both ancient and modern, means that these changes have a local regional and even European-wide impact.

Guy D. R. Sanders has been director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens’ Excavations at Corinth since 1997. He received his BA from the University of Southampton (1977, Geography and Archaeology) and went on to work as a land surveyor from 1978-1984. He received his MA from the University of Missouri (1986, Art History and Archaeology) and completed most class work for a PhD before taking up the post of Assistant Director of the British School at Athens (1988-94). His PhD was conferred by the University of Birmingham (1996, Ancient History and Archaeology) before being appointed Associate Director of Corinth in the same year.

He has excavated at Ayios Stephanos (1974, 1977) and the Menelaion in Lakonia (1974, 1984), at Phylakopi on Melos (1975, 1976), at Kourion as Field Director (1980-1981) and Saranda Kolonnes, 1983-1984) both on Cyprus, at Mirobriga in Portugal (1981, 1982) and Corinth (1986, 1995-1997). He has participated in archaeological surveys in Lakonia (1983-1988), the Strymon Delta (1983), Kalavasos and Stymphalos (1981-1983) and co-directed a survey in Melos with Richard Catling (1989-1992).

As a medieval and Roman ceramics consultant he has worked on several projects including twelve months as a research assistant in Corinth to Professor Kathleen Slane (1985-1986). His own excavations on Geometric, Hellenistic, Roman, medieval, and early modern levels in the Panayia Field at Corinth were conducted from 1995 to 2007. Excavations at Nezi field began in 2007.

His interests lie in economic, social and historical geography, archaeological science and
ceramics especially of the Late Roman, Byzantine, post Byzantine and Early Modern periods.

Prof. Dr. Joost Crouwel introduced the lecture and gave the opportunity for questions and discussion afterwards.

Thanks to the Byvanck Foundation this lecture has been published and handed out to the audience for free. A digital copy of the lecture can be downloaded for free here: download

Held for the first time in 2007, the Byvanck Lecture is the result of a generous donation from the bequest of the late Lily Byvanck-Quarles van Ufford, who has for many years been the driving force of our periodical BABESCH (formerly Bulletin Antieke Beschaving). The foundation set up in her name aims to further the scholarship of Archaeology and the quality of the publication she held so dear - in other words for the past to have a future, and so continue her work.

The subject of the Byvanck Lecture alternates each year between Greek and Roman.

This year, on the 29th of November, we proudly celebrated the tenth Byvanck Lecture. Below we list all lectures from the first to the latest, but certainly not the last.

Lecture 1, held on October 26th 2007
Alexandros Mazarakis Ainian (University of Thessaly), ‘Inside the Adyton of a Greek Temple: Excavations at Kythnos’.

Lecture 2, held on December 15th 2008
Simon Keay (University of Southamton), ‘Rediscovering Portus: The Port of Imperial Rome’.

Lecture 3, held on November 24th 2009
Cemal Pulak (Texas A&M University), 'The Uluburun Shipwreck and Late Bronze Age Maritime Trade in the Eastern Mediterranean'.

Lecture 4, held on November 16th 2010
Andrew Wallace-Hadrill (University of Cambridge) ‘Herculaneum: Living with Catastrophe’.

Lecture 5, held on November 1st 2011
Maria Bonghi Jovino (Università degli Studi di Milano) ‘The Archaic Temples of the Etruscans’.

Lecture 6, held on November 20th 2012
Dyfri Williams (British Museum, London) ‘Up Close and Personal: A New View of the Parthenon’s East Pediment’.

Lecture 7, held on November 19th 2013
Susan Alcock (Brown University, Providence), ‘What to do with a Wonder of the World: The Puzzle of Jordan’.
A short review of the lecture can be read here.

Lecture 8, held on November 25th 2014
Lawrence Stager (Harvard University), ‘Rites of Spring in the Carthaginian Tophet’.
A short review of the lecture can be read here.
Thanks to the Byvanck Foundation this lecture has been published and handed out to the audience for free. A digital copy of the lecture can be downloaded for free here: download

Lecture 9, held on December 15th 2015
Olga Palagia (University of Athens) ‘The Impact of Alexander the Great on the Arts of Greece’.
Thanks to the Byvanck Foundation this lecture has been published and handed out to the audience for free. A digital copy of the lecture can be downloaded for free here: download

Lecture 10, held on November 29th 2016
Guy D. R. Sanders (American School of Classical Studies at Athens).
Thanks to the Byvanck Foundation this lecture has been published and handed out to the audience for free. A digital copy of the lecture can be downloaded for free here: download

The Byvanck Lecture is organised in conjunction with the Dutch National Museum of Antiquities, and thanks to the Byvanck Foundation the admission is free.

We look forward to sharing the past with you in the future.